About Mrs. Buljan

Mrs. Danielle Buljan

Phone: Unavailable at this time but in the future: x.7423

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

BA in English, Option in Education from Chico State MA in Teaching from the University of Southern California Google certified educator Peardeck certified educator Khan Academy certified educator

Mrs. Danielle Buljan

Mrs. Buljan is in her 11th year of teaching. She has had a variety of experiences in K-12 education in many schools with many different people. Reading is her passion, and getting students excited about learning and growing is why Mrs. Buljan does what she does. She is so honored and excited to be a memer of the West Park team and cannot wait for what the future holds. She strives to be an antiracist teacher where students feel valued in her classroom, and where students feel they have voice, choice and power over their future.

 

Mrs. Buljan has been a resident of West Roseville for the past decade where she lives with her husband and two children. She is grateful for such a loving, special community to live in. She is appreciative of the opportunity to work with her neighbors and families in her community.

 


FALL 2020 SCHEDULE

1: CP English 10 block with AP EURO (year long course)

2: CP English 10

3: CP English 10

4: PREP

What I'm Reading

  • 180 Days

    by Kelly Gallagher and Penny Kittle Year Published: 2018 Nonfiction

    Per Google Books: Two teachers. Two classrooms.
    One school year.

    180 Days represents the collaboration of two master teachers-Kelly Gallagher and Penny Kittle-over an entire school year: planning, teaching, and reflecting within their own and each other's classrooms in California and New Hampshire. Inspired by a teacher's question, "How do you fit it all in?" they identified and prioritized the daily, essential, belief-based practices that are worth spending time on. They asked, "Who will these students be as readers and writers after a year under our care?"

    What we make time for matters: what we plan, how we revise our plans while teaching, and how we reflect and decide what's next. The decision-making in the moment is the most essential work of teaching, and it's the ongoing study of the adolescents in front of us that has the greatest impact on our thinking.

    Comments (-1)
  • American Born Chinese

    by Gene Luen Yang Year Published: 2006 Fiction

     

    Per Wikipedia: American Born Chinese is a graphic novel by Gene Luen Yang. Released in 2006 by First Second Books, it was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Awards in the category of Young People's Literature

    Comments (-1)
  • Butter

    by Erin Jade Lange Year Published: 2012 Fiction

    Per Google Books: A lonely obese boy everyone calls "Butter" is about to make history. He is going to eat himself to death-live on the Internet-and everyone is invited to watch. When he first makes the announcement online to his classmates, Butter expects pity, insults, and possibly sheer indifference. What he gets are morbid cheerleaders rallying around his deadly plan. Yet as their dark encouragement grows, it begins to feel a lot like popularity. And that feels good. But what happens when Butter reaches his suicide deadline? Can he live with the fallout if he doesn't go through with his plans?

    Comments (-1)
  • Clap When You Land

    by Elizabeth Acevedo Year Published: 2020 Fiction

    Per Google Books:  Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people...

    In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal's office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash.

    Separated by distance-and Papi's secrets-the two girls are forced to face a new reality in which their father is dead and their lives are forever altered. And then, when it seems like they've lost everything of their father, they learn of each other.

    Papi's death uncovers all the painful truths he kept hidden, and the love he divided across an ocean. And now, Yahaira and Camino are both left to grapple with what this new sister means to them, and what it will now take to keep their dreams alive.

    In a dual narrative novel in verse that brims with both grief and love, award-winning and bestselling author Elizabeth Acevedo writes about the devastation of loss, the difficulty of forgiveness, and the bittersweet bonds that shape our lives.

    Comments (-1)
  • Dear Martin

    by Nic Stone Year Published: 2017 Fiction

    Per Google Books: Justyce McAllister is a good kid, an honor student, and always there to help a friend—but none of that matters to the police officer who just put him in handcuffs. Despite leaving his rough neighborhood behind, he can't escape the scorn of his former peers or the ridicule of his new classmates.

    Justyce looks to the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for answers. But do they hold up anymore? He starts a journal to Dr. King to find out.

    Then comes the day Justyce goes driving with his best friend, Manny, windows rolled down, music turned up—way up, sparking the fury of a white off-duty cop beside them. Words fly. Shots are fired. Justyce and Manny are caught in the crosshairs. In the media fallout, it's Justyce who is under attack.

    Comments (-1)
  • Educated

    by Tara Westover Year Published: 2018 Nonfiction

    Per Wikipedia: Educated is a memoir by the American author Tara Westover. In it, Westover recounts overcoming her survivalist Mormon family in order to go to college, and emphasizes the importance of education to enlarging her world.

    Comments (-1)
  • How to Be an Antiracist

    by Ibram X. Kendi Year Published: 2019 Nonfiction

    Per Wikipedia: How to Be an Antiracist is a 2019 non-fiction book by American author and historian Ibram X. Kendi. The book discusses concepts of racism and Kendi's proposals for anti-racist individual actions and systemic changes. It received positive critical reception

    Comments (-1)
  • Just Mercy

    by Bryan Stevenson Year Published: 2014 Nonfiction

    Per Wikipedia: After graduating from Harvard, Bryan Stevenson heads to Alabama to defend those wrongly condemned or those not afforded proper representation. One of his first cases is that of Walter McMillian, who is sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of an 18-year-old girl, despite evidence proving his innocence. In the years that follow, Stevenson encounters racism and legal and political maneuverings as he tirelessly fights for McMillian's life.

    Comments (-1)
  • Open Book

    by Jessica Simpson Year Published: 2020 Nonfiction

    Per Google Books: Jessica reveals for the first time her inner monologue and most intimate struggles. Guided by the journals she's kept since age fifteen, and brimming with her unique humor and down-to-earth humanity, Open Book is as inspiring as it is entertaining.

    Comments (-1)
  • Persepolis

    by Marjane Satrapi Year Published: 2003 Nonfiction

    Per Google books: Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

    Comments (-1)
  • Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

    by Mildred D. Taylor Year Published: 2004 Fiction

    Per Google Books: 
    Set in Mississippi at the height of the Depression, this is the story of one family's struggle to maintain their integrity, pride, and independence in the face of racism and social injustice. And it is also Cassie's story—Cassie Logan, an independent girl who discovers over the course of an important year why having land of their own is so crucial to the Logan family, even as she learns to draw strength from her own sense of dignity and self-respect.

    Comments (-1)
  • So You Want to Talk About Race

    by Ijeoma Oluo Year Published: 2018

    From Amazon: In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard-hitting but user-friendly examination of race in America.

    Comments (-1)
  • Sparrow

    by Sarah Moon Year Published: 2017 Fiction

    Per Google books: Sparrow has always had a difficult time making friends. She would always rather stay home on the weekends with her mother, an affluent IT executive at a Manhattan bank, reading, or watching the birds, than play with other kids. And that's made school a lonely experience for her. It's made LIFE a lonely experience.

    But when the one teacher who really understood her -- Mrs. Wexler, the school librarian, a woman who let her eat her lunch in the library office rather than hide in a bathroom stall, a woman who shared her passion for novels and knew just the ones she'd love -- is killed in a freak car accident, Sparrow's world unravels and she's found on the roof of her school in an apparent suicide attempt.

    With the help of an insightful therapist, Sparrow finally reveals the truth of her inner life. And it's here that she discovers an outlet in rock & roll music...

    Comments (-1)
  • Stamped from the Beginning

    by Ibram X. Kendi Year Published: 2016 Nonfiction

    Per Google Books: Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America is a 2016 non-fiction book about race in the United States by Ibram X. Kendi that won the National Book Award for Nonfiction

    Comments (-1)
  • The Color Purple

    by Alice Walker Year Published: 1982 Fiction

    Per Wikipedia: Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of African-American women in the Southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. 

    Comments (-1)
  • Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

    by Grace Lin Year Published: 2009 Fiction

    Per Wikipedia: Where the Mountain Meets the Moon is a fantasy-adventure children's novel inspired by Chinese folklore. It was written and illustrated by Grace Lin and published in 2009

    Comments (-1)